Donald Trump’s stunning policy reversal on China’s currency

Donald Trump’s stunning policy reversal on China’s currency

22 April 2017, 03:28
Jiming Huang
0
34

Donald Trumps stunning policy reversal on Chinascurrency this week shone a light on theadministrations contradictory views on foreignexchangeand risks expos

ing the president to apolitical backlash over abandoned campaignpromisesanalysts say.

The president on Thursday backed away from hissignature vow to brand China a currencymanipulatorexecuting a U-turn from one of hismost attention-grabbing 

campaign pledges.

It was one of a number of volte-faces this week,including a declaration that Nato is no longer “obsolete” and warmer words for Janet Yellen,the Federal Reserve chair

that appeared to leave open

 the option of reappointing her nextyear.

By ditching the China pledgeMr Trump helped ease bilateral tensions with Beijingbut alsoinvited accusations that the president is going soft on his vows to clamp 

down on perceivedunfair trade practices.

China has hailed the decisionsaying it would promote “more balanced growth” in bilateraltrade. “We do not intend to spur export growth through competitive depreciationand therenminbi has no basis for continuous depreciation,” foreign ministry spokesman

 Lu Kang saidon Thursday.

As recently as FebruaryMr Trump labelled Beijing a “grand champion” of currencymanipulation and promised tough actionwhile his administration has urged the

 InternationalMonetary Fund to take a tougher line with Beijing over currency.

The China move opened the door to some Democratswho had already begun to see MrTrumps softening on Beijing as an opportunity to reclaim the anti-trade message that wasso crucial to his victory in November in industrial states such as Ohio.

Chuck Schumerthe top Democrat in the Senatethis week said that the opposition party wasassembling a trade package designed to get tough on China in order 

to force the presidentshand.

Specialists in international economics welcomed the decisionsaying that it recognised thereality in foreign exchange marketsgiven that Beijing has been intervening

 to hold up thevalue of the currencynot to drive it down.

The move leaves the door open to tough language in a forthcoming Treasury report on foreignexchange practices around the worldwhile defusing some of the tensions

 that havesurrounded the China-US relationship.


Howeverin the same interview with the Wall Street Journal in which he backed away fromcalling China a currency manipulatorMr Trump renewed his complaints 

about the high value ofthe dollarin words that will trigger concern in some overseas capitals.

His declaration that the US currency was “getting too strong” clashed with recent messagesfrom his Treasury secretarySteven Mnuchinwho has stuck more closely

 to the traditional USrhetoric in favour of a strong dollar.

If Mr Trump persists with his willingness to verbally intervene about the high dollarhe willcomplicate relations with foreign partners over the longer runanalysts said.


Share it with friends: