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Something Interesting in Financial Video June 2017 - page 2

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Sergey Golubev
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Sergey Golubev  

Trade Like a Casino for Consistent Profits by Adam Khoo

In the stock market, there are 'gamblers' and there are 'casinos'. Gamblers depend on luck to make money and would eventually lose it all, because the game is rigged against them. 'Casinos' know how to rig the system to generate consistent profits from random outcomes of chance. Learn how to trade like a casino!

These are essential stock trading strategies for stock traders and investors who want to improve their investment and trading performance.


Sergey Golubev
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101650
Sergey Golubev  

Introduction to Bitcoin, explained for beginners (part 1/3)


Victor Ziborov
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Victor Ziborov  
Сергей Голубев :

Введение в Bitcoin для трейдеров и инвесторов



Sergey, this video is not available.

Sergey Golubev
Moderator
101650
Sergey Golubev  
Victor Ziborov:

Sergey, this video is not available.


I will upload the other one.
Thanks for the information.

Sergey Golubev
Moderator
101650
Sergey Golubev  

Introduction to Bitcoin, explained for beginners (part 2/3)


Sergey Golubev
Moderator
101650
Sergey Golubev  

Introduction to Bitcoin, explained for beginners (part 3/3)


Sergey Golubev
Moderator
101650
Sergey Golubev  

Identifying Highly Probable Trade Targets | Dean Malone


- Do you know the peak of highest probability when exiting a trade?
- One of the major problems for many traders is not having well-defined exit targets before entering the market.

Dean Malone of CompassFX will show 5 techniques to identify "High Probable Trade Targets". These techniques can be used in most every market... Stocks, Futures, and Forex.

  • Whether you are a scalper, intraday trader, or a swing trader, trading with High Probable Trade Targets provide you with clearly defined profitable exit objectives matched to your trading style. 
  • Learn from Dean where to exit with a high degree of probability so that you can keep your emotions in check, trade better, and reach your trading goals.

Sergey Golubev
Moderator
101650
Sergey Golubev  

Candlestick Indicators in Price Action Trading



The basics of reading candles and charts

Since candlestick and bar charts are the fundamental interface of the price action trader, the most basic unit is the candle or bar itself. Candles sum up the price action over a set period of time: on a 5 minute chart, each candle represents 5 minutes of price behavior, whereas on a daily chart, only one candle is produced per day. The body of the candle constitutes the range between the open price and close price, whereas the wicks or shadows of the candle indicate the high and low over that period of trading. Various color schemes are used to determine whether the price movement represented by the candle is bullish (increasing in price) or bearish (decreasing in price); bullish candles are usually white, blue, or green, whereas bearish candles are usually black or red.

Longer candle bodies demonstrate strong momentum and decisive market behavior in the movement from open to close; longer shadows, however, demonstrate increased volatility, since some prices were reached during the time period but ultimately excluded from the range between open and close.

Smaller candles can indicate the market's indecision, disinterest, or a balance between bullish and bearish forces

Similarly, a candle that is almost all wick implies that, regardless of the range of prices occurring in the time period, the open and close were extremely close; these candles are referred to by the Japanese term, doji

A doji or small candle with a very long wick in one direction is referred to as a pin bar, which is often interpreted as a sign of potential trend reversal 

By contrast, a marabuzo candle has a large body, and almost no wick, implying that price action has been more definitive

There are two important, rudimentary patterns that play out over at least 2 candlesticks:

An outside bar is a bar with a higher high and a lower low than the previous candlestick, often with a body that also encompasses the price range of the previous bar's body; an alternative variation is the engulfing bar, which simply has a higher open and a higher close, regardless of the candle's shadows or wicks.

By contrast, an inside bar is a bar, or series of bars, with a high and low encompassed by the preceding candle; in this case, the variation is the harami, a bar or series of bars with an open and close within the range of the bar preceding it.

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